Beekeepers

Beekeeping is a traditional part of smallholding and the WFA welcomes beekeepers who use sustainable practices in the management of their hives.

We consider sustainable practices to include:

  • The use of renewable, natural materials in hive construction (e.g. wood from sustainable sources in preference to polystyrene)
  • No synthetic chemical or medicinal treatments (i.e. no pyrethroids, no prophylactic treatments including antibiotics, no organo-phosphates). Organic acids (e.g. oxalic, formic) and powdered sugar are permitted.
  • Allowing the bees to build their own comb in preference to the use of foundation
  • Top bar hives in preference to framed hives
  • Honey sold either in the comb, or cold extracted and strained but not fine filtered to remove pollen grains

The WFA has its own, expert beekeeper – Phil Chandler. 

Click here to visit Phil’s website, The Barefoot Beekeeper, and learn more: it’s a brilliant resource.

If you want to join the WFA as a Beekeeper, click here.

Beekeepers

Beekeeping is a traditional part of smallholding and the WFA welcomes beekeepers who use sustainable practices in the management of their hives.

We consider sustainable practices to include:

  • The use of renewable, natural materials in hive construction (e.g. wood from sustainable sources in preference to polystyrene)
  • No synthetic chemical or medicinal treatments (i.e. no pyrethroids, no prophylactic treatments including antibiotics, no organo-phosphates). Organic acids (e.g. oxalic, formic) and powdered sugar are permitted.
  • Allowing the bees to build their own comb in preference to the use of foundation
  • Top bar hives in preference to framed hives
  • Honey sold either in the comb, or cold extracted and strained but not fine filtered to remove pollen grains

The WFA has its own, expert beekeeper – Phil Chandler. 

Click here to visit Phil’s website, The Barefoot Beekeeper, and learn more: it’s a brilliant resource.

If you want to join the WFA as a Beekeeper, click here.